Taliban Agreement With Us Text


The Karzai government reportedly held talks with Baradar in February 2010; However, later this month, Baradar was captured in a joint attack between the United States and Pakistan in the city of Karachi, Pakistan. Although sporadic efforts have taken place since the war began in 2001, negotiations and the peace movement intensified in 2018, amid talks between the Taliban, the main insurgent group fighting the Afghan government and U.S. troops; and the United States, thousands of whose troops are present in the country to support the Afghan government. [1] In addition to the United States, regional powers such as Pakistan, China, India and Russia, as well as NATO, play a role in facilitating the peace process. [2] [3] [4] The formal agreement between the United States and the Taliban outlines a series of discussions that will continue into the future between the United States, the Taliban, and the Afghan government. And yet, persistent violence, especially against innocent civilian communities, largely denies the value of these discussions. It is precisely in the timetable that the Taliban are attacking the Afghan government when they are not attacking the United States and our allies. Why should the U.S. commit to an agreement in which the Taliban could conclude that the U.S. and its coalition partners would be safe from attack, but the U.S. would be confident that the Taliban would attack our main ally in this war, the Afghan government? At first glance, the Afghan government would struggle to find a good logical reason to meet amid the relentless attacks.

These Taliban activities are the very definition of bad faith behavior, and with the departure of the United States, the Afghan government will have far less power and authority to hold the Taliban to account and start talks on even an approximate basis. Members of the Taliban delegation are meeting saturday in Doha, the Qatari capital, before the signing ceremony with the United States. See Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images caption This means that negotiations are likely to be long and the US will have to suspend the withdrawal to make the Taliban give in. . . .